Canadian Conference on Electrical and Computer Engineering

Organizing Committee

Conference General Chair
Hussein Mouftah
University of Ottawa

Organizing Committee Chair
Ramiro Liscano
University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Technical Program co-Chairs
Rafik Goubran,
Carleton University
Voicu Groza and
Abdulmotaleb El Saddik
University of Ottawa

Local Arrangements Chair
John Grefford
CRO Engineering Ltd.

Publication co-Chairs
Raed Abdullah
Hydro Ottawa
Tariq Al-Omari
Carleton University

Publicity Chair
Bahram Zahir Azami
Hivva Technologies

Finance Chair
Branislav Djokic
National Research Council Canada

Sponsor / Exhibit Chair
Jasmin Roy
Communications Research Centre

Industrial Relations Chair
Maike Luiken Miller
NCIT

Workshop / Tutorial Chair
George Yee
National Research Council Canada

DRDC Workshop Chair
Sreeraman Rajan
DRDC Ottawa

Student Activities
Vijay Narasimhan
University of Ottawa

Webmaster
Amir Ghavam
University of Ottawa

IEEE Canada President
Robert Hanna
RPM Engineering Ltd.

Conference Advisory Chair
Witold Kinsner
University of Manitoba

Secretary & Registration Chair
Wahab Almuhtadi
Algonquin College, School of Advanced Technolgy

1385 Woodroffe Ave., Ottawa, ON, Canada, K2G 1V8
Phone: (613) 727-4723 Ext. 3403
E-mail: ccece06@ieee.org

Registration co-Chairs
Preeti Raman,
EIDOS Ottawa
Soorena Merat,
IEEE Ottawa


Technology for a better World

May 7 to 10, 2006 - Ottawa Congress Centre, Ottawa, Canada
http://www.ieee.ca/ccece06/

 

DRDC WORKSHOP

Signal and Information Processing for Defence Applications

Sunday, May 7th (8:00 AM-5:00 PM)

Contact: Sreeraman Rajan, DRDC Workshop Chair, sreeraman.rajan@DRDC-RDDC.GC.CA

Modern military operations are critically dependent on the ability to acquire, process and distribute information from sophisticated sensors with minimal human intervention. Signal and Information processing play a prime role in such operations. Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) has organized a full day seminar to emphasize the importance of signal and information processing for defence applications.

Workshop Chair: Dr. Sreeraman Rajan, Defence Scientist, DRDC Ottawa.

Session Chair: Mr. Robert Inkol, Senior Defence Scientist, DRDC Ottawa.

This workshop consists of oral and poster presentations. Each workshop attendee will receive a CD ROM which would be part of the Proceedings of the CCECE 2006 containing only the workshop papers.

The CCECE 2006 Organizing Committee would like to express sincere appreciation to all the workshop presenters for volunteering their time and expertise.

This workshop consists of the following presentations:

Presentations
S. No. Title Author(s)
1 Person Identification using Electrocardiogram A.D.C. Chan, M.M. Hamdy, A. Badre and V. Badee
2 Vehicle-network Development on a communication-network testbed

J. L. Rapanotti

3

Computing Far-Field Impulse Response of an X-band Navigation Radar Slot Difference Time-Domain Method

C. Wu and J. Lee

4

A Decision Theoretic Modulation Recognition Algorithm for Intentional Modulation on Pulse (IMOP) Applications

Y. Zhou and S. Sung

5

Estimation of Pulse Parameters by Convolution

Y.T. Chan, B.H. Lee, R. Inkol and F. Chan 

6 Advanced Image Exploitation Tools for Surveillance and Target Detection with EO Sensors A. Jouan, D. Lavigne, F. Leduc
7 The Discrete Probability Density Method for Target Geolocation D. Elsaesser
8 An Expectation Maximization Based Simultaneous Registration and Fusion Algorithm for Radar Network Z. Li and H. Leung
9 Performance Comparison of the FFT Majority and Median CFAR Detectors S. Wang, R. Inkol and S. Rajan
10 Applications of Signal Processing Algorithm Performance Benchmarking to Systems based on Personal Computer Technology R. Inkol, C. Wilson, M. Eidus
11 A Distributed Multisensor-Multitarget Tracking Test Bed for Maritime Surveillance D. Akselrod, A. Sinha, T. Kirubarajan, M. Farooq, Z. Ding
12 Advances in Communications Electronic Warfare D. Baker
13 (P) Focusing Distorted ISAR images Using the S-method T. Thayaparan, L. Stankovic, and M. Dakovic
14 (P) Decomposition of Time-varying Multicomponent Signals Using Time-Frequency-based Method T. Thayaparan, L. Stankovic, and M. Dakovic
15 AIRIS - The Canadian Airborne hyperspectral imager P. Fournier, T. Smithson, D. St-Germain

(P): Poster Presentation 1.

1. Person Identification using Electrocardiograms by A. D. C. Chan, M. M. Hamdy, A. Badre and V. Badee, Department of System and Computer Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.

Abstract: The electrocardiogram (ECG) is proposed as a new biometric for person identification. ECG person identification offers advantages for medically related applications that already monitor the ECG, as there are no additional data requirements. It is also well suited for multi-modal biometrics, as it could be simultaneously recorded in fingerprint or palm recognition systems, and would improve system accuracy and reliability. ECG data were collected from over 50 healthy subjects using a simple procedure; holding two button electrodes on the pads of the thumbs, using the thumb and index fingers. Data were collected from all subjects in three sessions on different days. Data from session 1 were used to establish an enrolled database and remaining data were used as test cases. Using a combination of correlation and wavelet distance measures between test signals and the enrolled data, a classification accuracy of 90% was obtained.

Spaeker's Bio: Adrian D.C. Chan received the B.A.Sc. degree in computer engineering from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, in 1997, the M.A.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada in 1999, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada in 2002.He is currently an Assistant Professor with the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada. His research interests include biological signal processing, pattern recognition, and noninvasive sensors. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE, a member of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, and a member the Canadian Medical and Biological Engineering Society. He is also the Track Chair for the Biomedical and Bioinformatics, for CCECE 2006.

2. Vehicle-network Development on a Communication-network Testbed by J. L. Rapanotti, DRDC Valcartier

Abstract: Light armoured vehicles will rely on sensors, on-board computing and digital wireless communications to achieve improved performance and survivability. Constrained by low latency response to threats, individual vehicles will share sensory information with other platoon vehicles benefiting from a flexible, dynamic, self-adapting network environment. As sensor and computing capability increases, network communications will become saturated. To understand the operational requirements for these future vehicle networks, the High Capacity Technical Communications Network (HCTCN) Low Bandwidth Test Bed (LBTB) has been developed to provide a simulated environment for the radios and candidate database and transmission protocols selected. These concepts and approach to network communications will be discussed in the paper.

Speaker’s Bio: Dr. Rapanotti received all his degrees from the University of Waterloo in Mechanical Engineering. His interests are in developing modelling and simulation capability of weapon and threat systems that rely on chemical energy conversion for performance, and design of guidance and threat detection sensors.

3. Computing Far-Field Impulse Response of an X-band Navigation Radar Slot Waveguide Array Using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method by C. Wu and J. Lee, DRDC Ottawa, Canada.

Abstract: This paper demonstrates using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to investigate the interrelationship between the waveform characteristics of radar signal in the radiation field and the structure of the radar antenna array. It provides a simple way to investigate radar signal in the radiation field without using expensive measurement setup. A waveguide slot array used in an X-band navigation radar is used as an example in the study, and the approach can be used to investigate other radar antennas.

Speakers’ Bio: Chen Wu is currently a Defence Scientist in DRDC Ottawa. Since he joined DRDC Ottawa, he has been working on the research and development of novel miniature electronic support payload design and integration, and specific emitter identification for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) applications. From 2000 to 2002, he worked in Apollo Photonics Inc. as a Senior Research Engineer, where he managed the company software development team to deliver the first version of Apollo Photonics Solutions Suite ? (APSS). From 1998 to 2000, he worked in Litva Antenna Enterprises Inc. as VP Engineering. During this period, he developed a number of antennas for different wireless companies. From 1989 to1998 he worked in Communications Research Lab at McMaster University. As a research engineer, his main research areas were integrated microstrip antennas, MIC/MMIC circuits and electromagnetic modeling. The antennas that he developed for a number of Canadian companies have been used in different wireless products. During his professional career, he has published 32 journal papers, 37 conference papers, 16 internal publications and obtained 2 US patents. He is a Senior member of IEEE.

4. A Decision Theoretic Modulation Recognition Algorithm for Intentional Modulation on Pulse (IMOP) Applications by Y. Zhou and S. Sung, DRDC Ottawa, Canada

Abstract: In this paper, a decision theoretic modulation recognition algorithm is proposed for classifying different signal modulation types as well as noise. The modulation type includes unmodulated CW, narrow-band FM, wide-band FM, triangular FM, BPSK, DSB-SC and AM. The algorithm involves a combination of decision theoretic and pattern recognition techniques. Decision theoretic technique is used to separate noise from the signals, the constant-envelope waveforms from the varying-envelope waveforms, the unmodulated CW from the waveforms with phase information, and the two varying-envelope waveforms from one another. The pattern recognition technique is based on the use of linear discriminants and is used to distinguish the three FM and BPSK waveforms. Computer simulations are used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed modulation recognition algorithm, and an extensive analysis is also included.

Speaker’s Bio: Yifeng Zhou received his B.Eng degree in electrical engineering, in 1985, from Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, the M.Sc degree in acoustics, in 1988, from Shanghai Acoustics Laboratory, Academia Sinica, Shanghai, and the Ph.D degree in electrical engineering, in 1995, from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. From January to August 1995, he worked as a post-doctoral fellow in the Communications Research Laboratory, McMaster University, on statistical signal processing and radar systems. From September 1995 to June 1998, he was employed as a research scientist by Telexis Corporation, Ottawa, Canada, doing research on signal processing for radar systems and sensor fusion. Since July 1998, he has been with Defence R\&D Canada - Ottawa, where he is currently a defence scientist with the Radar Electronic Warfare Section. His research interests are in the areas of statistical signal processing, radar systems, multi-sensor tracking and fusion, ESM signal processing and net-centric applications.

5. Estimation of Pulse Parameters by Convolution by Y.T. Chan, B.H. Lee, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, R. Inkol, DRDC Ottawa, Ontario, Canada and F. Chan, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Abstract: It is often necessary to find the time-of-arrival (TOA) of a pulse. A ranging radar requires a pulse TOA, while communication systems need TOA for synchronization. In emitter localization, receivers at separate locations measure the TOA of an emitted pulse. Then the pulse emitter is at the intersection of circles, centered at the receivers, with radii equal to the TOA multiplied by the speed of travel of the pulse. Common TOA estimators take the time when a pulse rises to, say, half of its final value as the TOA. But it is difficult to measure the amplitude accurately in noise. This paper proposes a convolution estimator that determines the TOA as a function of a convolution estimator that determines the TOA as a function of the convolution peak of the received signal. Simulation results indicated that this gives better accuracy than other estimators.

Speaker’s Bio: B. Haynes Lee received this B.Eng. degree in electrical engineering from Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada in 1987. From 1989 to 2006 he was a research assistant at the Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario where he is presently at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research interests are in digital signal processing and discrete-time queueing systems.

6. Advanced Image Exploitation Tools for Surveillance and Target Detection with EO Sensors by A. Jouan, D. Lavigne and F. Leduc, DRDC Valcartier, Canada

Abstract: To better serve the CF Image Analysts increasingly overwhelmed by the volume of imagery they have to process, members of the Data Exploitation group of the Optronic Surveillance Section at Valcartier spent the last four years to evaluate the capability of commercial software to address tasks as diverse as change detection, classification, objects detection and recognition. To improve the performance of the tools currently available they also developed advanced algorithms and toolboxes in-house or in partnership with the industry or the academia. The efforts in-house were focused on the development of three software tools: the Automated Multi-sensors Image Registration (AMIR) software, the Fuzzy Reasoning for Image Intelligence (FuRII) toolbox and an incremental machine learning system for ATD/ATR. This presentation gives visibility into the details of this activity and provides an up to date overview of the algorithms development and their validation. Further developments will be outlined.

Speaker’s Bio: François Leduc is a geographer and performed his Ph.D. studies in jointly between the Université de Montréal and the Université de Rennes 1 (France). He obtained his Ph.D. degree in 2003 in the field of remote sensing and signal processing. He is specialized in information fusion and in fuzzy and evidential reasoning. He joined DRDC Valcartier in 2003 as a member of the Data Exploitation Group. He works on algorithms development for ATD/ATR.

7. The Discrete Probability Density Method For Target Geolocation by D. Elsaesser, DRDC Ottawa, Canada

Abstract: The Discrete Probability Density (DPD) method is a novel technique for fusing sensor data by numerically combining the probability density function (pdf) representing the error estimate of each measured value. This paper describes the sampling of multiple pdfs at common discrete intervals to calculate a joint discrete probability density distribution. This concept is then extended into multi-dimensional space to combine sensor measurements taken from different locations by projecting each pdf onto an array of sample points and taking the joint product at each point to produce a discrete probability density distribution representing the fused result. The DPD method is applied to emitter geolocation using Line-Of-Bearing (LOB) measurements and compared to Stansfield's method and the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound using Monte-Carlo simulation. It is found that the DPD method performs better than Stansfield's method in the presence of large errors, especially for large number of LOBs.

Speaker’s Bio: Mr. Derek Elsaesser is a senior defence scientist in the Communication and Navigation Electronic Warfare Section at Defence R&D Canada – Ottawa. He received his B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Calgary in 1989 and M.A.Sc. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Ottawa in 2000. He has been conducting sensor data fusion research for over 16 years and is responsible for the development of several EW systems that have been deployed with the Canadian Forces.

8. An Expectation Maximization Based Simultaneous Registration and Fusion Algorithm for Radar Networks by Z. Li and H. Leung, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada

Abstract: In this paper, we present an expectation maximization (EM) based simultaneous registration and fusion algorithm for multiple radars network. Systematic biases of the radars are estimated using the EM algorithm. Interactive multiple model (IMM) approach is combined with the EM for simultaneous registration and fusion. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm works well in radar network target tracking.

Speaker’s Bio: Henry Leung received his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the McMaster University, Canada. He is now a professor of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Calgary, Canada. Before that he was with the Defence Research Establishment Ottawa (DREO), Canada, where he was involved in the design of automated systems for air and maritime multi-sensor surveillance. His research interests include chaos, computational intelligence, data mining, nonlinear signal processing, multi-media, radar, sensor fusion and wireless communications.

9. Performance Comparison of the FFT Majority and Median CFAR Detectors by S. Wang, R. Inkol and S. Rajan, DRDC Ottawa, Canada

Abstract: The FFT filter bank-based summation CFAR detector is a standard technique for detecting narrowband signals in noise. This detector has a near optimal performance for an additive white Gaussian noise channel and has been investigated extensively in the literature. The FFT majority and median CFAR detectors have been proposed for applications where impulsive noise severely degrades the performance of the FFT summation CFAR detector. Although based on different principles, these two FFT CFAR detectors are actually identical if the number of data blocks, L, is odd. When the number of data blocks L is even, these two detectors are no longer identical; hence, they require different treatment. The FFT majority and median CFAR detectors are expected to have very similar performance for an even number of data blocks; however no performance analyses are currently available in the technical literature. This may be attributed to the difficulty in the computation of threshold T for a given probability of false alarm Pfa. This paper provides a comparative study of the FFT majority and median CFAR detectors for an additive white Gaussian noise channel assuming an even number of data blocks. The main results of this paper complement other recent papers and technical reports on FFT CFAR detectors and are useful for selecting the appropriate FFT CFAR detector to meet application requirements.

Speaker’s Bio: Sichun Wang obtained his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Nankai University, China, and PhD degree from McMaster University, Canada, all in mathematics. He was a lecturer of Mathematics in Tianjin University, China and a sessional lecturer at Carleton University, Canada. Currently he works as a consultant with DRDC Ottawa. He has published in the areas of Fourier analysis and digital signal processing and communications. His research interests include FFT filter banks, detection and estimation, error correction coding, chaotic signal processing and blind equalization. He is an IEEE Member.

10. Applications of Signal Procesing Algorithm Performance Benchmarking to the Development of Signal Processing Systems Based on Personal Computer Technology by R. Inkol, C. Wilson, DRDC Ottawa and M. Eidus, Vantage Point International

Abstract: Personal computer technology has evolved to the point where many real-time signal processing applications that formerly required special purpose hardware can be implemented in software running on low-cost hardware. This paper describes a software benchmarking suite designed for benchmarking the achievable performance for common signal processing algorithms available as functions in the Intel Integrated Performance Primitive (IPP) libraries. Results presented for the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and single and multistage multirate Finite Impulse Response (FIR) filters confirm that high performance can be achieved at low cost with currently available technology. They are also useful for making trade-offs and design choices concerning algorithms, architecture and technology choices for high performance signal processing systems.

Speaker’s Bio: Robert Inkol received the B.Sc. and M.A.Sc. degrees in Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering from the University of Waterloo in 1976 and 1978, respectively. Since 1978 he has been with the Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) where he is currently a senior scientist. He has made contributions to the application of very large scale integrated circuit technology and digital signal processing techniques to electronic warfare systems. He is an adjunct professor with the Royal Military College and is a senior member of the IEEE.

11. A Distributed Multisensor-Multitarget Tracking Test Bed for Maritime Surveillance by D. Akselrod, A. Sinha, T. Kirubarajan, McMaster University, M. Farooq, Royal Military College of Canada and Z. Ding, Raytheon Canada Limited

Abstract: In this paper we present the development of a multisensor-multitarget tracking test bed for large-scale distributed (or network-centric) scenarios. The project, which is in progress at McMaster University and the Royal Military College of Canada, is supported by the Department of National Defense and Raytheon Canada. The objective is to develop a test bed capable of handling multiple, heterogeneous sensors in a hierarchical architecture for maritime surveillance. The proposed test bed will assist in developing different architectures for distributed surveillance with heterogeneous sensors and ways to quantify their performances, algorithms for preprocessing (e.g., registration, debiasing, out-of-sequence measurements, etc.) heterogeneous multisensor data, estimators of multitarget states using distributed, heterogeneous sensor data, fusion algorithms for combining raw sensor data, state estimates and target features in distributed and hierarchical architectures, resource management algorithms in heterogeneous, multisensor scenarios and a simulation environment to implement and evaluate the new algorithms developed in this project. Being a distributed Data Fusion System (DFS) emulator, the test bed is composed of one or more of Data Fusion Centers (DFC) which may reside on distinct computer systems, together forming a common emulating system interconnected via a network. A DFC thus presents one of the main elements which compose the emulated system and interconnection which define its final architecture. A DFC consists of the four main operational modules: Simulator, Tracker, Resource Manager, Tracking Performance Evaluator, and three auxiliary ones: System Manager, Human-Machine Interface (HMI), and Utilities module. The test bed currently consists of a scenario generator that can generate simulated data from multiple sensors including radar, sonar, IR and ESM as well as a tracker framework into which different tracking algorithms can be integrated. In the first stage of the project, the IMM/Assignment tracker, and the Particle Filter (PF) tracker are implemented in a distributed architecture and some preliminary results are obtained. Other trackers like the Multiple Hypothesis Tracker (MHT) are also planned for the future.

Speaker’s Bio: M. Farooq received his BscEng and MTech degrees from Punjab Engineering College, Chandigarh, India and the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi in 1965 and 1967, respectively, and his PhD from the University of New Brunswick, Canada, in 1974, all in Electrical Engineering. In March 1980, he joined the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC), Kingston, Ontario, where he is currently a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He has organized as well as served as technical chair on a number of conferences on Applications of Advance Technologies to Canadian Forces, and served as a Co-Editor of the resulting Conference Proceedings. He was a member of the Defense Advisory Board (Canada) which drafted a report on Fusion Technology in Canada.

12. Advances in Communications Electronic Warfare by D. Baker, DRDC Ottawa, Canada

Abstract: In support of the Land Force’s Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance Project, DRDC Ottawa is exploring new concepts for Communications Electronic Warfare (CEW) architectures and processes for data analysis and fusion. Major areas of research and development (R&D) include wideband CEW sensors, data analysis and processing, simulation, the integration of these into a single framework, and the processes needed to take advantage of the underlying technologies.

Speaker’s Bio: Darren Baker received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the Technical University of Nova Scotia and his M.A.Sc., specializing in ionospheric propagation, from the University of Toronto. He joined DREO as a summer student in 1987, and became a DS in the Electronic Warfare Division in 1989, where he performed R&D in Radar EW. In 1995 joined the NATO Airborne Early Warning team at the Shape Technical Centre in The Hague. While at NATO, he was primarily involved in providing scientific and engineering support to the NATO AWACS operational staff to assist them in the optimal use of their Electronic Support Measures system. During this time he was privileged to fly on many training and experimental missions, and one operational mission during the Bosnia Crisis. He returned to DRDC Ottawa in 2003 and joined the Tactical Electronic Warfare Systems (TEWS) Group in CNEW. In 2004 he became the Group Leader of TEWS and the Project Manager of ICEWARS TDP.

13. Focusing Distorted ISAR Images Using the S-method by T. Thayaparan, DRDC Ottawa, Canada and L. Stankovic and M. Dakovic, University of Montenegro, Montenegro, Yugoslavia

Abstract: Commonly used technique for the ISAR signal analysis is a two dimensional Fourier transform, which results in an image corresponding to the reflectivity, range and cross range of the target points. However, in the cases when the line of sight projection of the target point velocity changes or the movement within the coherent integration time is uncompensated then the Fourier transform produces blurred and distorted images. Standard techniques for these kinds of problems are in movement compensation or in the time-frequency analysis application. Both of them are computationally intensive. Here, we will present a numerically simple time-frequency based approach. The S-method is used as time-frequency analysis tool. This approach improves readability of ISAR images, with only a slight correction of the existing Fourier transform based algorithms.

Speaker’s Bio: Thayananthan Thayaparan earned a B.Sc. (Hons.) in physics at the University of Jaffna, Srilanka in 1987, an M.Sc. in physics at the University of Oslo, Norway in 1991, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric physics at the University of Western Ontario, Canada in 1996. From 1996 to 1997, he was employed as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Western Ontario. In 1997, he joined the erstwhile Defence Research Establishment Ottawa (DREO), Department of National Defence, Canada, as a Defence Scientist. His research interests, inter alia, include time-frequency analysis, applications to radar signal and image processing, Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Non-Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR), Moving Target Detection (MTD), ATR, meteors and ionosphere clutter in HF radar, and winds and waves in the middle atmosphere using MF and VHF meteor radars. He published over 90 papers in the international scientific journals and conferences

14. Decomposition of Time-varying Multicomponent Signals Using Time-Frequency Based Method by T. Thayaparan, DRDC Ottawa, Canada, L. Stankovic and M. Dakovic, University of Montenegro, Montenegro, Yugoslavia

Abstract: This paper proposes a new time-frequency based signal decomposition method. This approach is based upon the eigenvalue decomposition method, combined with the S-method that produces a sum of the Wigner distribution of individual signal components. The proposed decomposition method is theoretically derived. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed decomposition method is demonstrated on simulated examples. The noise analysis is performed in the algorithm for signal decomposition and it is shown that the choice of algorithm parameters does not have a great influence on the decomposition process. The method presented here is not restricted to this application, but it can be applied also in various other settings of non-stationary signal analysis and filtering, for example, moving target identification in Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images and micro-Doppler separation from Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) images, etc.

Speaker’s Bio: Thayananthan Thayaparan earned a B.Sc. (Hons.) in physics at the University of Jaffna, Srilanka in 1987, an M.Sc. in physics at the University of Oslo, Norway in 1991, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric physics at the University of Western Ontario, Canada in 1996. From 1996 to 1997, he was employed as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Western Ontario. In 1997, he joined the erstwhile Defence Research Establishment Ottawa (DREO), Department of National Defence, Canada, as a Defence Scientist. His research interests, inter alia, include time-frequency analysis, applications to radar signal and image processing, Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Non-Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR), Moving Target Detection (MTD), ATR, meteors and ionosphere clutter in HF radar, and winds and waves in the middle atmosphere using MF and VHF meteor radars. He published over 90 papers in the international scientific journals and conferences

15. AIRIS – The Canadian Airborne Hyperspectral Imager by P. Fournier, T. Smithson and D. St-Germain, DRDC Valcartier, Canada

Abstract: Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) Agency has successfully completed a Technical Demonstration Program (TDP) to assess the “Military Utility of Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery”. This required developing a sensor, the Airborne Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AIRIS), and collecting in-flight imagery data. The AIRIS instrument covers the 1.6 to 12 micron region of the electromagnetic spectrum by simultaneously operating two 8x8 element detector arrays to cover the entire spectral region. InSb technology is used to cover the 1.6 to 5.3 µm region, and HgCdTe technology to cover the 3.3 to 12 µm region. The spectral sampling is generated by a Fourier Transform spectrometer with a spectral resolution ranging from 1 to 16 cm-1. The frame rate of the sensor is variable and depends on the user-selected spectral resolution. The instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV) of the instrument can be changed from 1.2 to 3.6 mrad (and ¼ for each of those) by interchanging collection telescopes (9x or 3x). The total field-of-view (TFOV) of this hyperspectral imager is therefore small (8xIFOV) but may be pointed over a “field-of-regard” (FOR) 8 times that of the TFOV. In addition, Wide-FOV broadband cameras, operating in the visible, mid-wave and long-wave infrared bands, are used to register the entire FOR and collect contextual spatial imagery to support spectral data analysis. A GPS/INS system is used to guide the pointing of the imaging spectrometer module, which is essentially nadir looking. The AIRIS sensor was mounted in NRC’s Convair 580 aircraft. Two series of development flights in 2003 and in 2004 were necessary to ensure correct operation of the sensor and its associated hardware and software for the data collection flights scheduled in 2005. A series of three data collection flight tests were conducted in the summer of 2005, in three different regions of the country. The first test occurred in the Ottawa area and collected phenomenological data over rural, suburban and urban areas. The second test used several targets of different types (a mix of hot and ambient temperature targets, as well as some industrial sites) and occurred in Suffield in July 2005. The last flight test occurred in the Halifax area and collected phenomenological data over the ocean. Of these three tests, the one conducted in Suffield in July 2005 is the most documented since spectral measurements of targets were also made at ground level in addition to in-flight measurements by AIRIS. Three topics are covered in this paper. A technical description of the instrument is given first with an explanation of the technical challenges faced by the TDP Team. Then, analysis of spectral images collected in Suffield is discussed, with emphasis on selected images of hot sources collected by the InSb detector array. Preliminary analysis of selected examples shows that detection and characterization of sub-pixel hot targets is possible. The paper concludes with a discussion of the way ahead to continue the assessment of the military utility of airborne IR hyperspectral imagery for the Canadian Forces.

Speaker’s Bio: Pierre Fournier graduated from Université du Québec à Rimouski in 1987 with a B.Sc. In Physics. He then obtained a M.Sc. in physics from Université Laval in 1990. He began his Defence Scientist career as an operational research analyst in 1992, working for the Land Forces Operational Research Team at National Defence Headquarters in 1992 and 1993 before moving on to Air Transport Group Headquarters in Trenton from 1993 to 1997. Mr. Fournier continued supporting the Air Transport community when he was posted back to NDHQ in Ottawa from 1997 to 1999 where he worked on the CC130 Hercules replacement study and on the air transport fleet mix. Mr. Fournier was posted to DRDC Valcartier in September 1999 where he joined a recently formed operational research team with the mandate to support the R&D program. He was appointed Operational Research Team Leader in Valcartier in February 2000 and expanded the program of work developed by his predecessor while simultaneously providing support to R&D programs and to Technology Demonstration Programs, most notably the Defensive Aid Suite R&D program and the Future Armoured Vehicle Systems TDP. In October 2005, Mr. Fournier took a position with the Optronic Surveillance Section in DRDC Valcartier where he works in data exploitation of infrared hyperspectral imagery.

Note: This conference is being arranged in conjunction with the CCC 2006 conference

top of the page


Webmaster: Amir Ghavam, ghavam@ieee.org. This page last updated: May 4, 2006