Plenary 1: (Monday April 30th from 8:30am to 9:30am in Grand Salon) Alessandro Astolfi, "Model Reduction by Moment Matching for Linear and Nonlinear Systems"

Abstract:

The model reduction problem for (single-input, single-output) linear and nonlinear systems is addressed using the notion of moment. A re-visitation of the linear theory allows to obtain novel results for linear systems and to develop a nonlinear enhancement of the notion of moment. This, in turn, is used to pose and solve the model reduction problem by moment matching for nonlinear systems, to develop a notion of frequency response for nonlinear systems, and to solve model reduction problems in the presence of constraints on the reduced model. Connections between the proposed results, projection methods, the covariance extension problem and interpolation theory are presented.

Biography

Alessandro Astolfi was born in Rome, Italy, in 1967. He received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy, in 1991, the M.S. degree in information theory and the Ph.D. (with a medal of honor) degree from ETH-Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, in 1992 and 1995, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in 1996. Since 1996, he has been with the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department, Imperial College London, London, U.K., where he is currently Professor of Non-linear Control Theory and Head of the Control and Power Group. From 1998 to 2003, he was also an Associate Professor at the Department of Electronics and Information, Politecnico of Milano, Milan, Italy. Since 2005, he is a Professor with the Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, University of Rome "Tor Vergata". He is author of more than 100 journal papers, of 25 book chapters and of over 200 papers in refereed conference proceedings. He is Associate Editor of IEEE Trans. on Automatic Control, Systems and Control Letters, Automatica, the International Journal of Control, the European Journal of Control, the Journal of the Franklin Institute, and the International Journal of Adaptive Control and Signal Processing. He is the Chair of the IEEE CSS Conference Editorial Board. His research interests are focused on mathematical control theory and control applications, with special emphasis for the problems of discontinuous stabilization, robust stabilization, robust and adaptive control, and model reduction. Dr. Astolfi is a Fellow of the IEEE and the recipient of the IEEE Control Systems Society Antonio Ruberti Young Researcher Prize (2007) in recognition of distinguished cutting-edge contributions by a young researcher to the theory or applications of systems and control.

Plenary 2: (Monday April 30th from 11:30am to 12:30pm in Grand Salon) Vahid Tarokh, "Signal Processing for e-Health"

Abstract:

In recent year, computation, communications and networking equipments are rapidly becoming commoditized. This has forced some to believe that unless a new paradigm is opened (e.g. quantum mechanical), communications and networking (and their sub-domains) may not be the main driver of signal processing research in the years to come. Thus as signal processing engineers, some are faced with finding a new research agenda with real life applications for the years to come. One possible domain with potential impact is the applications of EE to health (i.e. e-health). Some believe that this area can be the driver for signal processing for the next decade. This talk reports on some of my recent research in this area (jointly with my collaborators). I will touch on our work on seizure prediction, EEG signals and spindle detection, classification of walking pattern of elderly, brain-computer interaction, and coronary MRI. We report that we have been able to get a lot of mileage from simple signal processing techniques in some of these areas (as most of the underlying signals have low bandwidth). Additional elegant ideas do not seem to produce the dramatic gains that we would like to see over simple or even ad hoc techniques, perhaps because biological signals are non-stationary and patient dependent. Is it the case that for biological systems: "As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality" ? Or is there simply underlying formulas that have not been written up yet? If yes, then are these formulas simple or complex? We do not know the answer to these questions. Perhaps, these will be answered as more of us try to address this important application area.

Biography

Vahid Tarokh received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1995. He worked at AT&T Labs-Research and AT&T Wireless Services until 2000 where he was (in chronological order) Senior Member of Technical Staff, Principal Member of Technical Staff and Head of Department of Wireless Communications and Signal Processing. In 2000, he joined the Electrical Engineering Department at MIT as an Associate Professor where he taught for 2 years. He then joined Harvard faculty and was appointed a Gordon MacKay Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2002. He was named Perkins Professor and Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow of Electrical Engineering in 2005. Tarokh's research results of last 18 years are summarized in about 60 research journal papers that are cited about 22,000 times by other scholars. He was one of the Top 10 Most Cited Researchers in Computer Science according to the ISI Web of Science during every quarter for the period 2002-2008. He holds 2 honorary degrees.

Plenary 3: (Tuesday May 1st from 8:30am to 9:30am in Grand Salon) Peter E. Caines, "The Mean Field Control of Massive Distributed Stochastic Systems"

Abstract:

Multi-agent competitive and cooperative systems occur in a vast range of designed and natural settings such as communication, economic, environmental, epidemiological, transportation and energy systems. However, the complexity of such large population stochastic dynamic systems often makes centralized control infeasible and standard game theoretic analysis intractable. The principal notion of Mean Field stochastic control is that when the agent population is very large individual feedback strategies (i.e. control laws) exist for all of the agents so that each agent will be in an approximate Nash equilib- rium with the precomputable behaviour of the mass of other agents. This holds because the infinite population Mean Field Equations of the theory yield control laws in the form of a precomputable mass feedforward control combined with a real time local state feedback control, and the key property of this con guration when applied to nite population systems is that the Nash approximation error vanishes as the population grows without bound. This talk will introduce the key ideas of this rapidly developing eld and will outline recent developments of the methodology for populations of plug-in electric vehicles.

Biography

Peter Caines received the BA in mathematics from Oxford University in 1967 and the PhD in systems and control theory in 1970 from Imperial College, University of London, under the supervision of David Q. Mayne, FRS. After periods as a postdoctoral researcher and faculty member at UMIST, Stanford, UC Berkeley, Toronto and Harvard, he joined McGill University, Montreal, in 1980, where he is James McGill Professor and Macdonald Chair in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. In 2000 the adaptive control paper he coauthored with G. C. Goodwin and P. J. Ramadge (IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 1980) was recognized by the IEEE Control Systems Society as one of the 25 seminal control theory papers of the 20th century. He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of SIAM and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and was elected to the Royal Society of Canada in 2003. In 2009 he received the IEEE Control Systems Society Bode Lecture Prize. Peter Caines is the author of Linear Stochastic Systems, John Wiley, 1988, and his research in- terests include stochastic, multi-agent and hybrid systems theory together with their links to renewable energy generation and transmission, communications, physics, economics and biology.

Plenary 4: (Tuesday May 1st from 12:00pm to 1:00pm in Grand Salon) Gregor v. Bochmann, "Distributed System Design from Global Requirements"

Abstract:

Distributed systems are difficult to design because (1) message exchanges between the different system components must be foreseen in order to coordinate the actions at the different locations, and (2) the varying speed of execution of the different system components, and the varying speed of message transmission through the different networks through which the components are connected make it very hard to predict in which order these messages could be received. This presentation deals with the development of distributed applications, such as communication systems, service compositions or workflow applications. It is assumed that first a global requirements model is established that makes abstraction from the physical distribution of the different system functions. Once the architectural (distributed) structure of the system has been selected, this global requirement model must be transformed into a set of local behavior models, one for each of the components involved. Each local behavior model is then implemented on a separate device, and realizes part of the system functions. It includes local actions and the exchange of messages necessary to coordinate the overall system behavior. The presentation will first review several methods for describing global requirements and local component behaviors, such as state machines, activity diagrams, Petri nets, BPEL, sequence diagrams, etc. Then a new description paradigm based on the concept of collaborations will be presented, together with some examples. The second part of the presentation will explain how local component behaviors can be derived automatically from a given global requirements model. Also the implementation of these behaviors using BPEL software environments for Web Services will be discussed. Finally, some novel approach to testing behaviors defined as collaborations will be presented and an outlook at possible applications in the context of service compositions, workflow modeling, Web Services and Cloud Computing will be discussed

Biography

Gregor v. Bochmann (FIEEE) is professor at the School of Information Technology and Engineering at the University of Ottawa since 1998, after 25 years at the University of Montreal. He is a Fellow of IEEE, ACM and the Royal Society of Canada. After initial research work on programming languages and compiler design, he started work on communication protocols around 1974 and devel­oped the field of "protocol engineering," applying software engineering principles to communication protocols. In the early eighties, he participated in standardization committees of ISO and ITU and took a leading role in the standardization of Formal Description Tech­niques for communication protocols and services at the Canadian and interna­tional levels. He is internationally well recognized for his innovative work on modeling the behavior of distributed systems by extended finite state machines, and on their verification and testing. He has had many research collaborations with industry and, from 1989 to 1997, held the Hewlett-Packard - NSERC - CITI Industrial Research Chair on communication protocols at the University of Montreal. Dr. Bochmann has received many prizes for his work, including the Thomas W. Eadie Medal of the Royal Society, the Award for Excellence in Research of the University of Ottawa, and in 2005 was recognized as a "Pioneer of Com­puting in Canada" at the CASCON conference organized by IBM and NRC. His recent work has been in the areas of software engineering for distributed applications, peer-to-peer systems, quality of service and security management for Web applications, and control procedures for optical networks.

Plenary 5: (Wednesday May 2nd from 8:30am to 9:30am in Grand Salon) Ke Wu, "Art of Mixing and Hybridization in Electrical Engineering"

Abstract:

The great success of many scientific discoveries and technological innovations can be attributed to multidisciplinary and cross-field research and development. In fact, quite a large number of those academic and industrial adventures are based on unique ingenious and organic features, mechanisms, or characteristics (usually complementary) of two or more different existing methods, whether mathematically, physically, chemically, or conceptually combined. In the long history of electrical engineering development, the art of mixing and hybridization can be seen everywhere. It has become the source of inspiration for endless creations and innovations. In this presentation, we will discuss and demonstrate the most recent examples of mixing and hybridization in the field of radiofrequency (RF), microwave electronics, and applied electromagnetics. These examples range from theoretical approaches, design techniques, technological platforms and device developments to system architectures. In particular, our distinct five achievements will be highlighted, including the space-spectral domain approach for multi-layered planar geometry analysis, the joint field-circuit model for universal and accurate CAD techniques, the substrate integration platform of planar and non-planar structures, the simultaneous electric- and magnetic tuning scheme for ultra-wide band frequency agility, and the hybrid architecture of radio and radar systems within single transceiver. Such successful and interesting mixing and hybridization examples suggest that future discoveries, creations and innovations in electrical and computer engineering require certain "marriage" among different domains.

Biography

Ke Wu is professor of electrical engineering, and Tier-I Canada Research Chair in RF and millimeter-wave engineering at Ecole Polytechnique (University of Montreal). He also holds endowed chair professorships (visiting) and honorary professorships at various universities in the world. He has been the Director of the Poly-Grames Research Center and the Founding Director of the Center for Radiofrequency Electronics Research of Quebec. He has authored/co-authored over 800 referred papers and also a number of books/book chapters and patents. His current research interests involve substrate integrated circuits (SICs), antenna arrays, advanced CAD and modeling techniques, microwave photonics, wireless power transmission, terahertz technology and development of low-cost RF and millimeter-wave transceivers and sensors. Prof. Wu serves on editorial boards of many international journals and encyclopedia including guest editor and editor. He was Chair and General Chair of many international committees, conferences and symposia. He has been providing technical and academic consulting services to universities, corporations and agencies around the world. He will be the General Chair of the 2012 IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium. He was the recipient of many awards and prizes including the first IEEE MTT-S Outstanding Young Engineer Award, the 2004 Fessenden Medal of the IEEE Canada and the 2009 Thomas W. Eadie Medal of the Royal Society of Canada (The Academies of Arts, Humanities and Sciences of Canada). Prof. Wu is an elected IEEE MTT-S AdCom member and served as the chair of the IEEE MTT-S Member and Geographic Activities (MGA) Committee. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE) and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is an IEEE MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer.

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       Important Dates:

  • Tutorial/workshop proposals (extended): December 9, 2011
  • Notification of acceptance: February 24, 2012
  • Author's Registration: March 9, 2012 Match 16, 2012
  • Advance Registration: March 30, 2012

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